HOW TO MAKE WARGAMES TERRAIN PDF

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Games Workshop, the Games Workshop logo, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,, Citadel, How to Make Wargames Terrain is a guide to building and painting. GW - How to Make Wargames Terrain 2nd Edition - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. manual detailing how to make verious tabletop terrain features. How to Make Wargames Terrain - Warhammer Fences, Walls and Hedges - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Modeling.


How To Make Wargames Terrain Pdf

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play, but wait you want some cool Warhammer terrain to go with your newly For all your Warhammer terrain making materials and supplies it's best to keep. Titre: How to Make Wargames Terrain Auteur: Games Workshop. Ce document au format PDF a été généré par ABBYY FineReader /, et a. How to make wargames terrain 2nd volwarmdilanmi.cf D&D Miniatures: Maps & Terrain Tiles Tabletop Games, Dioramas, Maps, Gaming,. Öffnen. More information.

It still contains many techniques and models that look great today and even has more detailed descriptions of certain techniques than the blue.

Neither book is written for the super advanced modeler who engages in the types of techniques covered by books on model railroading and military dioramas, but for making terrain as good as what you see at a GW bunker the blue book has you covered.

Except that it's out of print Which leads me to the second half of my title. Will we ever see a book like this again?

There have been several non GW books to feature sections on wargaming terrain, but nothing as extensive as what is in the GW books or as directly aimed at straitforward serviceable terrain rather than diorama quality masterworks. Also the few other books on Wargaming terrain are also either out of print or PDF only. Unfortunately I think the answer is no. A hill is the most useful item of terrain, and it's a good idea to have several different sizes and shapes of hill to choose from.

It is hills that do the most to transform a flat tabletop into a realistic battlefield. A Wood You could make a single terrain piece or opt for several small 'clumps' of trees which you can place together in groups with 'paths' in between for moving the troops. The wood is second only to the hill as the most useful terrain item.

Woods on their own can transform a flat table into an interesting battlefield. It is worth making several woods. A Section of River or Stream The most useful river section to start with is a curved bend which can be placed to run across the corner of a table. It should have somewhere for troops to cross, like a ford or a bridge.

Later on you can add further sections of different shapes without a crossing point. When you have three or four sections, or enough to go across the width of the table, you will have all the sections you need. Using two steep-sided hills to make a ravine.

An Area of Difficult Ground This can be a marsh, tangled scrub or boulder strewn ground. You will not really need more than two or three features of this kind in your collection. A Steep Hill The easiest steep hill to start with might have three steps, or if you like smooth-sided hills, make a steep cliff along one side. The first hill need only be fairly small in size and simple in shape. Later on you can experiment with different shaped hills featuring whatever crags, cliffs and scree slopes you like.

It is good to have at least one steep hill to add character to the battlefield. If you want to create mountainous battlefields you will need several different sizes and shapes of steep hill. Two steep hills can be placed facing each other to create a mountain pass, gulley or ravine. Walls, Hedges or Fences These features are best made in short sections about 10 or 15cm long. This allows them to be placed on the table in different ways to create long boundaries or fields or to go around or between buildings.

Make about three to start with then add more sections as you feel like it. You can mix together walls, fences and hedges when placing terrain.

Three sections can easily be all that you will need, but it is always worth making several of such simple and versatile terrain features. Later on you can add more buildings of the same kind, or vary the shape and size slightly. This will give you enough for a village. When you feel ambitious, tackle a big building, such as a tower or temple. This can be used on its own or as the centrepiece of a village. You won't need more than two or three simple huts or houses, so start experimenting when you have enough for a village.

Varied designs can be made by adding two basic houses together to make an 'L'-shaped building or by just making a basic house twice as big or by putting a wall round it. If the model goes horribly wrong, think about changing it into a burnt-out ruin! You do not really need to make more than one item of this kind to complete your collection of terrain. Even so, it is fun to interpret them differently and think about the form they might take on the various planets of the 40, universe.

Warhammer 40, is a game with the emphasis on individual models rather than regiments, so models can move over and around items of terrain more easily. Indeed, the models benefit from plenty of small items of cover. A Gently Sloping Hill Even for a Warhammer 40, battlefield it is still true that a hill is the most useful item of terrain and several hills will transform a flat tabletop into a realistic battlefield. Once again, you can interpret the idea of a hill in several different ways depending on what kind of planets you want to fight your battles on.

On a desert world, a hill might be an enormous sand dune or outcrop of smooth weathered rock. On an ice age world, it could be a huge snow drift.

Assembling Terra-Former tiles

The main opportunity for making a futuristic steep hill is in the weirdness of the crags and cliffs. Something volcanic springs to mind! Walls, Fences, Pipelines The use of crags, rocks, river sections and trees has created a detailed and complex battlefield for this Warhammer 40, conflict.

These are just as versatile as items of terrain for the Warhammer 40, battlefield as they are for the fantasy battlefield. Fences can be used to create compounds around buildings and pipelines can run across the table, link up industrial buildings or end in sludge pits of effluent!

A Wood Buildings and Ruins This is where you really have to think about what kind of planets you expect to be fighting your battle on. You could ignore woods altogether and opt for scenery portraying rugged, barren desert worlds or volcanic terrain. Even so, a few clumps of cactus, fungus, tough man-eating plants or stunted trees wouldn't go amiss.

If you want to be able to make a jungle landscape, then you will need several clumps of tropical trees. Start with small, simple items such as space shelters, bunkers or Ork hovels. Experiment by varying the shape and size of the buildings. This will give you enough for a settlement. Think of a theme for a group of buildings such as an industrial complex, for example.

Your idea may call for a big building as a centrepiece surrounded by smaller buildings. You could interpret the idea of a group of buildings around a big building as the hull of a crashed spaceship surrounded by engines and other bits of the spaceship which have broken off.

A ford or bridge is not as important and unlikely to be found on most planets. Also, the armies of the 41st millennium have more troops that can sweep across such obstacles. If you opt for a crevasse or ravine, the ends of the section can be tapered into a point so that the section can be placed anywhere on the table like a big crack in the ground and doesn't have to link up table edges. To make a ravine just make a river section without the water! Leave the 'river' bed as dry sand, gravel and boulders.

An Area of Difficult Ground This can be a marsh, tangled scrub, soft sand, boulder strewn ground or craters. Apart from craters, the main difference to the equivalent fantasy item is in the vegetation or the weirdness of the boulders. You might opt for tropical plants, big crystals or stalagmites. If you want to make some ruins, how about working to the theme of a ruined Imperial colony which has been fought over time and again so that all buildings are reduced to burnt out shells.

The advantage of working to a theme is that when you know how to make a building, it's easy to make several more in the same way, and it's fun to experiment with slight variations. Also, any that go wrong can be re-worked as ruined versions of the same kind of building. An Area of Very Difficult Ground This might be a patch of boggy ground, a slime-pit full of industrial effluent, a swamp or a multitude of other possibilities in the vastness of the Warhammer 40, universe.

While you might not want more than one such item of difficult terrain in a fantasy battle, in a Warhammer 40, battle these items are more useful, especially if they are small and grouped together in clusters.

So, let your imagination go wild! Things that spring to mind are stalagmites, boulders, wrecked vehicles, stacks of oil drums, lava pits and sludge ponds. The broad theme in each case is either a fantasy landscape or a science fiction landscape, perhaps set on other planets.

Why not take the idea of a theme for your terrain a stage further and make scenic items specially go with your army. You can build up your collection of terrain as you build your army, so that the two blend into a single great project. What is the landscape like in Ulthuan? Are the forests mainly oak trees or pine trees?

What are Elf houses like and how can the basic method for making a building be adapted to make an Elf house? Does the army belong to a mountainous realm, and if so, why not make most of your hills as steep hills with crags and cliffs? If you follow a plan like this, and introduce the theme of your army into your terrain, when the project is finished, you will have created 'Ulthuan' or wherever else you like.

Anyone who fights your army on your table must have invaded the home of the High Elves and so the battle is fought in the landscape found in your realm! If you encourage your opponents to do the same thing, then you will find yourself fighting in the Dwarf mountains or the Wood Elf forests when you play them on their home table.

If you meet an opponent for a game on neutral ground, or perhaps if you both want a slightly different battlefield for a change, you can mix up items from each of your collections. Now you are fighting on the frontiers of your two realms, or in a wilderness region between them. On this battlefield the landscape blends from one type to another, so if Wood Elves are fighting Dwarfs, the landscape must be the foothills of the mountains, where woods and steep hills occur together.

So, if you both come to the conclusion that the battle occurs in the Chaos wastes, leave out the village! If generating the terrain randomly, re-roll the score that generates a village. If the battle occurs in the mountains, then consider having at least half the hills on the table as steep hills. Supposing you both agree that the battle takes place on an Imperial planet that has been devastated by alien invaders.

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You both want to fight among buildings. We can already say two important facts about this planet: So, we end up with a battlefield featuring a group of several ruined Imperial buildings. The objective of each side is suddenly made clear: Perhaps you both decide to fight a battle on a feral world, but fancy mixing buildings and tropical forest. A little bit of thought and imagination can make the battlefield believable. Once again, we can deduce two facts about this world: Maybe there was once, but now the ruins are all overgrown.

Secondly, why are the two armies fighting here - there must be a reason. Perhaps they are looking for something?

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So we come to the main theme of the battlefield! The two armies have met at their final objective, a ruined settlement or crashed spaceship lost in the middle of the jungle on a feral world, and there is something very important in the ruins or the wreckage!

The battlefield is set up with this scene in mind. The armies must fight their way through the jungle to the central clearing, then fight in the ruins or the wreckage. Thus there are three zones of terrain on this battlefield: The theme has provided the ideal battlefield. No need to generate terrain randomly, or set it up symmetrically as in a competition, or place it in chequer-board fashion.

None of these approaches would have produced such an interesting or challenging battlefield. Designing the Battlefield to a Theme When setting up the battlefield, give some thought to where the battle is being fought. Battles don't just happen in the middle of nowhere! Perhaps one player's realm has been invaded by the opposing player's army. Perhaps the armies clash on the frontier, or encounter each other in some faraway land. Maybe they are both rivals on the same quest, perhaps the search for a magic item.

Just a few moments' thought and discussion will set the scene, then you will have a clear idea of the kind of landscape in which the battle is fought.

When choosing and placing terrain, both players keep in mind where the battle is being fought and try to create the appropriate The gate and the tower were made specially to go with this High Elf army. Some of them - like scissors and pencils - you'll probably already have at your disposal. Of all these tools, a good quality modelling knife is the most essential. The best kind of knife is the type with a retractable blade so that only a short amount of angled blade appears out of the handle.

When you're not using the knife, the blade can be retracted safely into the handle. Always cut away from you and never get your fingers in the way. Use the knife by scoring along the edge of a steel ruler to ensure a straight cut. Cut by scoring several times pressing lightly until the material is cut through.

On the whole it is better to limit the use of the knife to a minimum and avoid using it at all if possible. Scissors are safer and more easily controlled. There is not much that you need a knife for except cutting neat holes through cardboard for windows and doors or for cutting card that is too thick for the scissors. When using a knife, cut against a steel ruler rather than a plastic or wooden one or the knife will shave the edge of the ruler spoiling the straight edge.

The ruler is also used for measuring and drawing shapes on cardboard for making buildings. You will often want to draw the sides of buildings onto cardboard before cutting out the shapes.

Pencil is best for this, because ink from biros and felt pens will sometimes stain and seep through the painted surface of the model after it is finished, spoiling the effect. The best kind of scissors are those which are big enough to cut cardboard but not so big as to make it difficult to cut detailed shapes. You will need several different sizes of paint brushes.

The small sizes used for painting miniatures are fine for the later detailed painting of finished scenery, but in the earlier stages you will need big brushes which would be too big for miniature painting.

You could also use the tops of old aerosols. Use mixing pots to shake flock or sand over surfaces to be textured in this way. These big brushes are used for painting PVA glue, base colours such as green and drybrushing over large areas and rough surfaces. Cheap hardwearing bristly brushes are best. Brushes used for painting PVA need to be washed thoroughly after use or the bristles will dry into a solid mass. Brushes used for this kind of work will inevitably wear out quickly.

A big brush like this is useful for painting terrain. There are various grades ranging from coarse to fine. Any of these will do for smoothing down scenery. Coarse grades are probably better because fine grades soon clog up with plaster dust or sawdust. Clothes pegs are useful when making cardboard buildings. Use the pegs to hold the card in position temporarily while the glue dries. You can also use them to hold items together while the glue dries. Vices and clamps can be bought from hardware stores.

Some pliers are able to cut wire as well as bend it. These have a wire-clipper built into the design and so are a good all round tool. Otherwise you will need a small pair of wire clippers. It is virtually impossible to cut wire with scissors unless it is very thin and trying to do so will often blunt or ruin them.

Such tools can be bought from art shops or toy shops which sell modelling clay. A flat lolly-stick provides a good spatula. The saw is only really useful for sawing balsa wood or twigs and only the smallest teeth will do the job neatly. A sanding block is simply a flat-sided piece of wood or cork, with a piece of sandpaper wrapped round it.

There's no need to glue the sand paper to the block, just hold it on with your fingers as you work. In fact, finding new uses for ordinary household items is an enjoyable and rewarding aspect of making terrain. R eady-made model terrain suitable for Warhammer or Warhammer 40, is not easy to find, so most of the scenery you use in your battles you will have to make yourself. Making your own scenery is good fun, and is as much part of the hobby as painting miniatures.

Every terrain feature that you make yourself can be specifically designed to suit your games. This gives you the opportunity to tailor your terrain to the size of your table, or to make special pieces to fit in with your armies.

It benefits Wood Elf armies to have access to plenty of woods, for example. This section describes what materials you can make terrain out of. We've concentrated on materials that are readily available, cheap and easy to use. They will give you virtually the same results as specialist modelling materials, and will often be better and stronger.

The studio terrain pieces are made first and foremost to look impressive in photographs.

They are not strong enough to survive extensive gaming, and often need to be repaired after they've been used for playtesting. When you make your own terrain for gaming it's best to construct it from simple, strong materials rather than specialist modelling materials.

As you make more and more terrain, you'll make your own discoveries and develop your own ways of doing things. Here is a selection of the best and most easily found materials for scenery making. Each material is described, and we tell you where to find it, how to use it, what you can make with it and its advantages and disadvantages.

You can also download cardboard sheets of various thicknesses from art shops, large stationers and other shops that sell paper, pens etc.

The best kind of card to use for modelling, especially making bases, is the thick cardboard that brown boxes are made from. This is the sort that has one or two layers of corrugated cardboard in its thickness. It is easily cut with scissors or a modelling knife. Thin card can be cut with scissors, and is easy to glue and paint. Thin card is quite strong enough to make small model buildings.

It can also be cut into all kinds of shapes and strips which can be stuck on model buildings to make planks, doors, tiles, hatches and so on. Cereal packets are ideal for modelling, and are particularly suitable for making tiles, planks and hatches for model buildings. This cottage was made entirely from thin cardboard. Read about how to make it on page Thick brown cardboard is very useful for modelling.

Use it for making bases, rivers, hills, and many other things. Best of all, it's free! The best place to get cardboard boxes from is supermarkets, which usually have piles of empty boxes by the checkouts. The boxes themselves can be quite useful for storing terrain pieces in or as a tray for modelling materials and models which are not yet completed.

Another source of good quality card boxes is packing boxes for electrical goods such as televisions, videos, fridges etc. The sides and base of the box can be cut out to provide panels of thick cardboard that can be used as bases for models, terrain sections such as rivers, or it can be built up in layers to create hills.

If you use cardboard to make hills, it is easy to prick holes in the layers to 'plant' trees in them. Cardboard can also be used to make big, thick-walled buildings such as towers and fortress walls. It is often called wood glue because it is mainly used for bonding wood. It dries clear and takes several hours to dry completely. There are various other glues, such as superglue, which are used more for sticking together miniatures than for making terrain. Their main advantage over PVA for making scenery is that they dry rapidly, but the job will often require large quantities.

For making terrain, these glues are best used for the detailed work rather than the basic construction. It can be used for an amazing variety of tasks, will stick most things and is very strong.

PVA is the main type of glue for making terrain. Balsa wood can be found in most model shops and is used for making model aircraft because it is so light.

The bundles of offcuts which are sold in many model shops are good value and contain assorted shapes and sizes. Balsa wood is most useful for making buildings, especially timber buildings, bridges and fences. It can be filed into shape and can be painted and drybrushed to good effect. Chunks of expanded polystyrene are commonly used to package large electrical appliances such as televisions and fridges. Large, flat sheets of expanded polystyrene can be bought from hardware stores and doit-yourself supermarkets.

Polystyrene is lightweight and fairly easy to cut with a modelling knife. Its main use is for building up the layers of hills. However, polystyrene can be messy to work with, and is not as sturdy as other materials. If you want to use polystyrene, you will have to be careful to use only water-based paints and glues, because other sorts of paint and glue can melt it.

Thick corrugated cardboard is a good alternative to polystyrene. Chunks of polystyrene come in just as useful as large flat sheets. Cork tiles can be found in hardware stores and DIY supermarkets. They are sold in packs of about four or nine or depending on thickness. The thickest ones are about 1 cm thick and the thin ones are about 4mm thick. The tiles are about 30cm square, and can be smooth or coarse surfaced. The advantage of using cork tiles is that they are easy to cut with a modelling knife or even with scissors in the case of the thinner tiles.

The cut edges are very neat, so the tile can be cut into various shapes very accurately. Matchsticks could also be used for the same jobs, but cocktail sticks are better because they are pointed like miniature stakes and can easily be stuck into cardboard, cork tiles or polystyrene.

Cocktail sticks can be used for fences, stakes, logs and various details on models. Cork tiles can be glued with any kind of glue and holes can be pricked into them for trees. The tiles can be glued together in layers to make hills that will be stronger and better than cardboard or polystyrene. Thick tiles can be used for the walls of big buildings such as fortresses and the battlements, gates and windows can be cut through the thickness of the tile.

Thick tiles are also good for bases for models and hills or woods. Cocktail sticks were used extensively on this Warhammer 40, fortified tower. This sort of sand can be bought from pet shops, and is used for the bottom of bird cages. SAND Sand is readily available from pet shops where it sold for fish tanks and bird cages.

There are various types and grades but the most useful is shell sand, which is pale yellow with fragments of shell in it. Similar sand can be found on beaches. Gritty sand is also useful because it gives a very rough texture and drybrushes very well. Sand is used in combination with PVA glue to texture bases and flat surfaces. PVA is painted onto a surface and sand is scattered over the sand to create a rough texture.

When the glue is dry, the sand can be painted and drybrushed to look like grass, desert, snow or rough concrete. Sand can also be mixed with PVA glue to make a thick, viscous paste. This can be spread with a spatula over built up cardboard, cork tile or polystyrene to create a smooth surface for gently sloping hills.

There are several different kinds such as DAS which can be bought in art, toy and model shops. Clay as used for making pottery is no use for making terrain since it will never dry properly and crumbles.

Cardboard tubes can be scavenged from packaging, the most readily available being toilet rolls and kitchen rolls.

Biscuits, crisps and other foods often come in thicker tubes. Modelling clay can be shaped, smoothed and scored with your fingers or modelling tools or even the end of a paintbrush to get many interesting shapes, surfaces and effects.

You can use it to shape boulders, crude ruined walls, carved stone monoliths, tree trunks, stone walls, banks of rivers, slopes or crags on hillsides, thatched roofs, craters, ruts on roads and many other things. Modelling clay dries hard if left in a dry place for a day or so. Try to avoid letting it dry too quickly or it may crack.

When completely dry the clay can be carved, filed or smoothed down with sandpaper. Fuel tanks, oil refineries, bunkers and crashed spaceships all spring to mind and you can let your imagination run riot.

Tubes could also be used for round towers whether these are part of futuristic or fantasy buildings. If a tube is cut into sections these can become the circular walls of primitive huts. A tube cut lengthways becomes a long canopy suitable for a bunker, hangar or tunnel. Narrow tubes can be used as huge pipes linking buildings together.

This paste can also be used like filler for a variety of tasks, such as building up the banks of river sections or the edges of craters. If small stones and bits of wood are mixed into the paste it will dry into a realistic-looking rubble to pile up around the walls of ruined buildings and craters. They can be stuck in rows on the outside of buildings to represent logs or as pipes on futuristic buildings.

GW - How to Make Wargames Terrain 2nd Edition

The best kind of tape for modelling work is masking tape available from hardware shops and stationers. It is mainly useful for holding things together while they glue, but can be used instead of glue to construct cardboard buildings. Plastic straws are ideal for pipes in Warhammer 40, terrain. It can be bought in hardware shops and DIY supermarkets in tubs. Ready mixed stuff is better and more convenient than mixing your own from plaster powder and far less messy.

Usually the quality of the ready-mix is finer and better for modelling. You can also get it in squeezy tubes. Corks as used in bottles can be bought from chemists where they are sold for in bags for home brewing. Corks can be used for pillars and columns in buildings and ruins, or as oildrums. Filler is easily applied with a spatula or strip of cardboard and can be smoothed over rough surfaces or built up layers of cardboard, cork or polystyrene to create hillsides.

It can also be built up into river banks or crater edges. Plasticene can be bought from toy shops and art shops in quite big slabs. It can be used to build up hill slopes, river banks and craters and can be given a hard surface by painting it with PVA or covering it with PVA and sand mixture. Unlike modelling clay it will always remain soft under the surface. FLOCK through the flock. When the paint is dry, paint the surface with PVA glue then scatter flock over it.

Also known as scatter, flock is fine coloured sawdust. It is sold in various colours, usually shades of green, brown or yellow, of which green is the most useful. You can download flock from Games Workshop stores and most model shops, especially model railway shops. Flock is used to cover terrain with a natural texture representing grass or earth. To cover a surface with flock, first paint the same colour as the flock so that the original colour of the terrain does not show The model should be placed on newspaper before scattering the flock to avoid a mess.

It will also make it easier to retrieve the surplus flock to use again. When the glue is dry shake or gently tap the model to make the excess flock fall off, leaving you with a textured, coloured surface. More than one layer of flock can be used to ensure complete coverage and diluted PVA can be gently painted over the flock to stop it gradually rubbing off as the scenery is used.

The best use of flock is for covering the bases and hills. You can also use it for foliage on trees and hedges. A very basic tree or hedge can be made by cutting a piece of sponge or polystyrene into the shape of tree and painting it dark green, black or brown.

When the paint is dry, paint it with PVA and cover it with flock. When it's dry, the flock will look like leaves. Sand is not very good for this, though you could always try fine sawdust and paint it green afterwards. Putting flock in an upturned box lid keeps it tidy when you're using it.

Instead of flock, you could use PVA scattered with sand, paint it, then drybrush it in a lighter shade. This will give you a similar result to flock, but is more hard wearing. Electrostatic grass can be used for adding grassy-looking detail to terrain bases. The colours that you will use most are green in various shades, brown or sandy yellow. Since it is also a good idea to undercoat scenery to completely disguise the colour of the cardboard etc so that the final colours are bright, you will need a lot of white or black paint as well.

The best paint to use is acrylic because it is soluble in water, will cover almost anything without melting it or reacting with the glue or other materials.

Acrylic also gives a very tough surface that does not rub off easily or scuff off rough surfaces. Citadel paints are all acrylics of this kind. One way to obtain a large quantity of green paint for painting a gaming table or huge piece of terrain is the method we use. Take a pot of Goblin Green paint into your local hardware superstore and Spray paint is perfect for painting large areas like hills quickly.

Do not use spray paint on polystyrene as the solvents in the paint will melt the polystyrene. Most stores of this kind have a machine for mixing special colours to order and will know what to do. Alternatively, you could look for a premixed shade of emulsion that is approximately the right colour. These can be used as trunks for model trees, dead trees, fallen trees, piles of logs or even rough and primitive timber beams for huts, fences and bridges.

The best stones are rough, irregular ones that look most like rocks rather than smooth round ones. These can be stuck randomly on scenery to look like rocks and boulders and often look better when painted and drybrushed. The box contains ten pots of water soluble paint, a brush, two Citadel miniatures, and the tray incorporates a handy mixing palette.

This clump of rocks was made from real stones painted with texture paint. The base has been textured with sand and flock. The strands are thicker than the hairs of a paintbrush and are usually creamy-white in colour. The best sort of string is about 1 centimetre thick. It is certainly worth trying though, and the trees which are most likely to be successful are tropical types such as palm trees, outsize ferns and huge plants with broad leaves which can be cut out of paper.

Links to some free papercraft terrain

By far the quickest and best solution is to download ready-made model trees such as those sold in Games Workshop stores. They have a wire trunk which can be stuck into a cardboard, polystyrene or cork base, so a hill made up of layers of these can be covered in trees to be given an impressive wooded slope. Ready-made trees come in all different sizes, shapes and shades of green, from tiny round bushes to tall pine trees. Useful spare 'bits' of various materials and bits of models can be kept in the bit box until needed.

Whenever you find something you think might come in useful one day - put it in your bit box! Thick string can be cut into short sections about 2. Dip the end of the tuft in glue and stick it on the scenery. You will need to use very tacky glue for this or do not unravel the string until after the tuft is firmly glued down.

Paint the tufts green when they are dry and they will look like big tufts of long grass. They are especially effective between rocks and around the bases of trees and fences. Bristles from old brushes also make good reeds and patches of tall grass. When you break off the models and parts off the plastic kit, the sprue is what's left behind. Don't throw this away! Instead, look at the sprue to see whether there are any bits that can be used for making terrain.

Short lengths of plastic sprue can look like timber posts, iron girders or metal pipes. When painted up, these can be used to add detail to buildings and ruins. Thick seisal string can be frayed and used for grass and reeds. A pack of fuse wire is a good start, as they supply you with several thicknesses of wire. Wire must be cut with a pair of wire cutters, or pliers that can cut wire. Do not use scissors or you will ruin them. Wire is useful for detailed work such as making tropical trees, wicker fences, barbed wire entanglements and wires on futuristic buildings.

So long as you are careful and sensible you shouldn't have any problems. The best kind of scissors are ones that are big enough to cut cardboard but not so big as to make it difficult to cut detailed shapes. For more detailed work it is best to use a modelling knife.

The best kind of knife is the sort that has a retractable blade so it can be stored safely when not in use. When using a knife, remember to make all cuts away from yourself, so if the knife slips you don't cut your fingers. Cut by scoring several times, pressing lightly until the material is cut through. Do not press too hard on the blade or it may snap, slip or cut through into the table.

Blunt blades are more dangerous than sharp ones, so change your knife's blade regularly, and dispose of old blades carefully. Storage If you use modelling knives, or any other potentially dangerous modelling equipment, store it safely somewhere when you're not using it.

When not in use, the knife is stored with its cap on. When in use, the cap is taken off and the blade extended. There is no danger in using aerosols provided you follow a few basic precautions. Read the instructions on the can and follow them while you use it.

Before use, shake the can thoroughly. Spray the model from a distance of about cm. We can already say two important facts about this planet: firstly, all the buildings will be Imperial style buildings and secondly, most of them will be in ruins!

So, we end up with a battlefield featuring a group of several ruined Imperial buildings. The objective of each side is suddenly made clear: capture the ruined settlement, claim the city for the Emperor! Perhaps you both decide to fight a battle on a feral world, but fancy mixing buildings and tropical forest.

A little bit of thought and imagination can make the battlefield believable. Once again, we can deduce two facts about this world: firstly, it's feral, which means 'untamed wilderness' so there can't be much settlement on it, if any.

Maybe there was once, but now the ruins are all overgrown. Secondly, why are the two armies fighting here - there must be a reason. Perhaps they are looking for something? So we come to the main theme of the battlefield! The two armies have met at their final objective, a ruined settlement or crashed spaceship lost in the middle of the jungle on a feral world, and there is something very important in the ruins or the wreckage! The battlefield is set up with this scene in mind.

The armies must fight their way through the jungle to the central clearing, then fight in the ruins or the wreckage. Thus there are three zones of terrain on this battlefield: a central open area, a group of ruins or wreckage in the middle of this zone and woods scattered all around the edges of the table. The theme has provided the ideal battlefield. No need to generate terrain randomly, or set it up symmetrically as in a competition, or place it in chequer-board fashion.

None of these approaches would have produced such an interesting or challenging battlefield. Designing the Battlefield to a Theme When setting up the battlefield, give some thought to where the battle is being fought. Battles don't just happen in the middle of nowhere! Perhaps one player's realm has been invaded by the opposing player's army.

Perhaps the armies clash on the frontier, or encounter each other in some faraway land. Maybe they are both rivals on the same quest, perhaps the search for a magic item.Yes the game was weak, but bits and tips in that article I used on a bunch of stuff.

You may need to do this twice to get good coverage. If the battle occurs in the mountains, then consider having at least half the hills on the table as steep hills.

If so, use the original shape as a template for the others. I'll check them out. The Base It is a good idea to stick the trunk onto a firm base before dealing with the foliage so you can stand it up while you work on it.

JULEE from Charlotte
Please check my other articles. One of my extra-curricular activities is field hockey. I love reading books angrily .
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